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Myopia

Myopia, or nearsightedness, means that your eyes can see close objects clearly but struggle to see things in the distance. Nearly 30 percent of 
Americans are nearsighted. This condition usually develops in children and teenagers, up to about the age of 20. A teacher or parent might notice a child squinting

Myopia, or nearsightedness, means that your eyes can see close objects clearly but struggle to see things in the distance. Nearly 30 percent of Americans are nearsighted.

This condition usually develops in children and teenagers, up to about the age of 20. A teacher or parent might notice a child squinting at the chalkboard or TV. Other common symptoms include headaches, frequent blinking and rubbing of the eyes and failing to notice distant objects.

Causes

If the curvature of your cornea — the clear part on the front of your eye — is too steep, you will be nearsighted. Myopia can also be caused by an eyeball that is too long, relative to the lens’ and cornea’s focusing power. Light entering your eye will not be correctly focused, causing things in the distance to look blurry.

However, what causes these defects is still under debate. Heredity and visual stress are leading contenders. If both parents are nearsighted, the child is at higher risk. Examples of visual stress include excessive reading, computer use or other tasks that demand the eyes to focus on close objects. Note: Myopia due to close work is sometimes temporary.

Eye problems can also be symptoms of other disorders, such as diabetes or a cataract developing in the eye.

Testing and Diagnosis

Eye doctors test patients’ vision by having them read letters on a Snellen chart that is placed about 20 feet away from the patient. Your doctor may also use lighted instruments to determine the focusing power of your eyes. Sometimes, eye doctors use eye drops to dilate the eyes. This temporarily prevents the eyes from changing focus, so he or she can examine them more easily.

Once your eye doctor finishes the test, he or she can determine whether you have myopia. If you suffer from myopia, you and your eye doctor will discuss possible treatment options.

Non-Surgical Treatment Options

Eyeglasses are the most commonly prescribed and least invasive method of treating myopia. Depending on how nearsighted you are, you might need to wear glasses some or all of the time. If you also have trouble seeing things close-up, your eye doctor might prescribe bifocals. These let you see both far and close objects more clearly, and are popular with patients over the age of 40.

Contact lenses can provide a wider field of vision and may let you see more clearly. However, because they are worn directly on the eye, they need extra care and cleaning. Contact lenses are not recommended for those who are squeamish about touching their eyes.

Orthokeratology, also called corneal refractive therapy, involves wearing rigid contact lenses that reshape your cornea’s curvature. This therapy changes how light enters your eyes, eventually making your eyes focus correctly. The results from orthokeratology are temporary, and patients must continue to use these specialized contact lenses to maintain results.

Surgical Treatment Options

Laser procedures such as photorefractive keratectomy and LASIK have become more prevalent over the last few decades. With laser vision correction surgery, the ophthalmologist uses laser energy to remove a small amount of corneal tissue, thus reshaping the curvature of the cornea and correcting the refractive error that is causing myopia.

Highly nearsighted people may be better suited for another type of refractive surgery, including refractive lens exchange (RLE). The ophthalmologist implants a corrective lens directly into the eye. This lens is placed either right in front of the eye’s natural lens or it replaces the natural lens entirely.

Many treatments are available to myopic patients. Call our practice today, so we can help you decide which one is best for your visual needs and lifestyle practices.

A New Way to Manage Myopia

We are happy to inform you that we are now certified providers of CooperVision’s Brilliant Futures™ Myopia Management Program. The cornerstone of this comprehensive approach to myopia management is the MiSight® 1 day contact lenses – the first and only so contact lenses specifically designed for myopia control and FDA-approved* to slow the progression of myopia in children, aged 8-12 at the initiation of treatment.†1

Myopia, commonly known as nearsightedness, affects more than 40% of Americans2 and is increasing at an alarming rate, especially among school-aged children.3 A number of factors can influence if someone develops myopia, including family history. The likelihood of a child developing myopia increases if their parents have it4 and research also shows that modern lifestyle factors, like increased screen time and less time outdoors, may influence its development as well.5,6 It’s important to address a child’s myopia because worsening myopia may contribute to sight-threatening conditions later in life including retinal detachment, myopic maculopathy, glaucoma and cataracts.7-11

CooperVision conducted a rigorous multi-year, multi-country study to show how the MiSight® 1 day contact lenses affected myopia progression when initially fit on children 8-12 years old. After 3 years, the study concluded that the lenses effectively slowed myopia progression by an average of 59% and slowed the rate at which the eye lengthens by an average of 52%, compared to the control group.†12 After 6 years, nearly one in four eyes originally fit with MiSight® 1 day had no progression of myopia.**13 These convenient, daily disposable contact lenses are well-accepted by children††14 and do not affect their daily activities. They are designed to be worn for ten or more hours per day for maximum treatment effect.

We are excited to offer the Brilliant Futures™ Myopia Management Program with MiSight® 1 day contact lenses to our patients and we hope that you will join us in our efforts to address myopia for a brighter tomorrow. If you would like any further information on managing myopia in children, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

Indications and Important Safety Information

Rx only

Results may vary.

ATTENTION: Reference the Patient Information Booklet for a complete listing of Indications and Important Safety Information. *Indication: MiSight® 1 day (omafilcon A) so (hydrophilic) contact lenses for daily wear are indicated for the correction of myopic ametropia and for slowing the progression of myopia in children with non-diseased eyes, who at the initiation of treatment are 8-12 years of age and have a refraction of -0.75 to -4.00 diopters(spherical equivalent) with ≤ 0.75 diopters of astigmatism. The lens is to be discarded aer each removal. Warnings: Problems with contact lenses could result in serious injury to the eye. Do not expose contact lenses to water while wearing them. Under certain circumstances MiSight® lenses optical design can cause reduced image contrast/ghosting/halo/glare in some patients that may cause diculties with certain visually-demanding tasks. Precautions: Daily wear single use only. Patient should always dispose when lenses are removed. No overnight wear. Patients should exercise extra care if performing potentially hazardous activities. Adverse events: Including but not limited to infection/ inflammation/ ulceration/ abrasion of the cornea, other parts of the eye or eyelids. Some of these adverse reactions can cause permanent or temporary loss of vision. If you notice any of the stated in your child, immediately have your child remove the lenses and contact your eye care professional.


†Compared to a single vision 1 day lens over a 3 year period.
** -0.25D or less of change. Lenses fitted between the ages of 8-12 at initiation of treatment.
†† 95% - 100% of children expressed a preference for contact lenses over glasses at each visit over 36 months.

References

1  Chamberlain P, et al. A 3-year randomized clinical trial of MiSight® lenses for myopia control. Optom Vis Sci. 2019; 96(8):556-567.
2 Vitale S, Sperduto RD, Ferris FL 3rd. Increased prevalence of myopia in the United States between 1971-1972 and 1999-2004. Arch Ophthalmol. 2009;127(12):1632-1639. doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2009.303
3 Cooper Y. (2019, May 1). With Childhood Myopia Rates on the Rise, the American Optometric Association Highlights the Importance of Early Intervention through Annual Eye Exams. Retrieved from https:// www.aoa.org/newsroom/myopia-rates-on-the-rise-syvm.
4 Morgan P. Is Myopia Control the Next Contact Lens Revolution? OPTICIAN 2016
5 Giord P, Giord, K L. The Future of Myopia Control Contact Lenses. Opt Vis Sci. 2016;93(4):336-43.
6 Wolsohn JS, Calossi A, Cho P, et al. Global Trends in Myopia Management Attitudes and Strategies in ClinicalPractice. Cont Lens Anterior Eye. 2016;39(2):106-16.
7 COMET Group. Myopia stabilization and associated factors among participants in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET). Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2013;54(13):7871-7884. Published 2013 Dec 3. doi:10.1167/iovs.13-12403
8 Xu L, Wang Y, Wang S, Wang Y Jonas JB. ‘High Myopia and Glaucoma Susceptibility: The Beijing Eye Study. Ophthalmology, 2007;114(2):216-20.
9 Flitcro DI. The complex interactions of retinal, optical, and environmental factors in myopia aetiology Prog Retin Eye Res. 2012;31(6):622-660.
10 Chen SJ, et al. Prevalence and associated risk factors of myopic maculopathy in elderly Chinese: the Shihpai eye study. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012;53(8):4868-4873.
11 Chen SJ, et al. High myopia as a risk factor in primary open angle glaucoma. Int J Ophthalmol. 2012; 5(6):750-753.
12 CooperVision data on file 2019. Chamberlain P, Logan N, Jones D, Gonzalez-Meijome J, Saw S-M, Young G. Clinical evaluation of a dual-focus myopia control 1 day so contact lens: 3-year results (2016 American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting) and 5-year results (2019 BCLA Clinical Conference & Exhibition).
13 Chamberlain P, et al. Myopia Progression in Children wearing Dual-Focus Contact Lenses: 6-year findings. Optom Vis Sci 2020;97(E-abstract):200038.|
14 Sulley A et al, Wearer experience and subjective responses with dual focus compared to spherical, single vision so contact lenses in children during a 3-year clinical trial. AAO 2019 Poster Presentation. 

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